Red Bank, Crimson Tide and A Three Way

Justin October 8, 2011 0

No one wants to see Weird Al with me and I think that’s a terrible indictment of where we are as a society.

Mr Yankovic, one of the great comic minds of our time, brings his “Alpocolypse” tour to the Count Basie theater on Tuesday night. Through my vast network of connections, I have the opportunity to attend the show without having to pay for tickets.  I found this out a few months ago. As you can imagine, I was very excited. I’ve mentioned in the past that I went to a Weird Al concert when I was in high school and it was one of the great shows I’ve ever been too.  How hard could it be to find someone to go with me? Well, it turns out, it’s been very hard.

I will admit that part of the problem is timing and location. No one welcomes the idea of traveling to Red Bank, New Jersey, a place 60 miles from New York City, on a Tuesday night.  If that were everyone’s reason for not wanting to go, I would be satisfied. But it’s not. And that makes me sad.

Apparently, a Weird Al concert is something to be mocked. I was ridiculed for even suggesting it, then showered in sarcasm. Even Beltway Buddy said no and he is unquestionably the bottom of the barrel when it comes to things like maturity and feeling shame.

It seems my friends are so worried that someone else might think they’re doing something “uncool,” that they won’t even consider an evening of innocent, un-ironic fun. How could you not love song parodies? How could you not love a man in glasses and a mustache dancing in a fat suit? HE ALSO RAPS!

Where is your sense of mirth, America? You are a mirthless people, utterly without mirth.

For shame!

Sports Illustrated. October 10th, 2011

Tim Thomas, Hockey, Boston Bruins

PREGAME:

Last week, I made an off hand mention of the fact that Sports Illustrated had the word “Ass” on it’s cover. Apparently, I wasn’t the only one who thought this was weird.

Poor Judgment

My oldest son is a huge Jets fan, so when I first saw the image of Mark Sanchez on your Sept. 19 cover, I knew he would be thrilled. However, when I read the cover’s headline my heart sank. I couldn’t have been more disappointed. With all of the great performances from the NFL’s opening weekend, I don’t understand why you chose to quote two of the most foul-mouthed coaches in the league. Not only did I get upset for my own children but also for all of the other kids out there who are fans of your magazine.

William Earnest

Gainesville, Ga.

EDITOR’S NOTE: SI received more than 100 letters objecting to the Sept. 19 cover language. While the intent was to reflect the exuberance of coaches Rex and Rob Ryan, the use of the quote was ill-advised. It was an error in judgment.

I think SI deserves some credit for admitting their mistake. (its mistake? I never know if I should refer to the magazine as an object or as a collective of writers and editors. Thoughts?) But the fact remains, the line “Sweet Ass Live” does not reflect the exuberance of the Ryans. It reflects their classlessness.

Speaking of class, another letter this week seems like it came out of a 4th grade classroom.

What Novak Djokovic accomplished at the U.S. Open (The Outrage Open, Sept. 19) and on the ATP Tour this year is stunning. Few accomplishments require the athleticism, endurance and composure that it takes to win a Grand Slam—and he won three this season. Case in point: After being down two sets and then fighting off two match points against Roger Federer in the Open’s semifinals, Djokovic had to face Rafael Nadal, the tournament’s defending champion. Djokovic, in true championship fashion, won convincingly.

Trip Strauss, Little Rock

This is not a letter to the editor as much as it is a book report. Trip Strauss sat down at his computer, wrote a summary of S.L. Price’s US Open article then sent it into Sports Illustrated. Why? And why was it published?

THE ARTICLES:

Remade In Detroit by Damon Hack

This is the right article at the right time. The Lions have been THE story of the NFL season thus far and taking their record to 4-0, I think, vaults them from surprising early year success to legitimate contender.  SI waited just long enough to profile them. The focus on Ndamukong Suh seems to be a symptom of Calvin Johnson’s quiet nature as much as it is Suh’s outspoken personality and outstanding ability.  (While we’re talking about Suh, read this interview with him as well. It’s very good.)

Tide And Punishment by Lars Anderson

It seems pretty early in the season to proclaim Alabama’s defense the best ever.

Movable Feast by Tom Verducci

This is, pretty much, a perfect article.  Instead of writing about the individual playoff series, Verducci writes about a single trade which impacted each one. I have this habit when I watch baseball. If a game starts to drag a bit, I try to trace back how each member of both teams ended up with the franchise. So, I love giant three way trades.

Soooo.. Where Is Everyone Hooping Today??? #LA by Lee Jenkins

If you haven’t realized it so far, I love this week’s Sports Illustrated. Instead of just writing about games, each author came up with a creative way to tackle their subjects. Brandon Jennings has always been a compelling figure. He seems mature beyond his years yet still has fun like a little kid.

It’s A Whole New Game by Michael Farber

This article is a little dry, but it provides a good primer for fans who maybe haven’t been paying close attention to the NHL pre-season. It explains why players may end up spending more time in the penalty box this season and why others may end up being suspended outright. I just finished watched the Rangers play the Ducks in Stockholm (They were in Stockholm. I was at home. Two minutes for bad sentence structure.) At one point, Rangers captain Ryan Callahan got called for boarding on what was probably a borderline call. Thanks to this article, I understood why the ref decided to blow his whistle.

Scouting Reports by SI Staff

The good teams will continue being good. The bad teams will continue to be bad. With the exception of the Blackhawks, every team SI picks to win their division finished either 1st or 2nd in their division last year. That’s a little boring.

Point After by Joe Posnanski

Another sportswriter romanticizing an old timer. These are a dime a dozen.

 

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